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January 16, 2009

What Brands Can Learn From Dog Trainers

Shiloh-zoe-dogs
                                                                                                Photo © Amanda Jones

You can learn a lot about connecting with your customers/audience/partners by understanding some of the basic rules of dog training.  Now don't jump to conclusions and think that I am equating customers with dogs. (This is not a "they'll eat the dog food" kind of post.)  Rather, the key point is this:  You really can't force dogs to do things, certainly not on a consistent basis.  They need to trust you.  They need to respect you and your actions, which comes from you being consistent.  It's gotta be fun.  New stuff needs to be thrown into the mix to keep their attention, but still must remain consistent to the core goal and what has been learned in the past.  They need breaks and pacing so they aren't overwhelmed with information and shut down.  Oh yeah, they look to each other (the pack) for cues and exchange notes with each other at the dog park.  I know; I've seen it.

Any of this sound familiar? Egv_tiny_blogicon


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Liz Gebhardt


  • © Amanda Jones
    Digital and traditional (live & broadcast) media/ marketing strategist and producer living at the intersection of Web meets (live) World. More than two decades of experience in building media and technology businesses, content programming and distribution, brand stories and integrated communications campaigns.

    Believes that strategy is all talk unless it can be executed in a way that delivers on both the creative and business promises. Embraces the role of navigator of the uncharted path vs. passenger along the known road.